Transit worker assault is a growing epidemic across North America. In Maryland, one state legislator is taking action as attacks on DC-area bus operators went up in 2017. Del. Angela M. Angel has proposed a new bill to increase the penalty for attacking a transit operator to a second-degree felony, punishable by up to 15 years in prison and a $5,000 fine. “House Bill 28 will give the same protections to transit workers that are already extended to law enforcement and emergency responders,” says Local 689-Washington, DC. “We understand that transit worker assaults are not only a danger to the workers, but also to the riding public, who are also placed in harm’s way when these incidents occur.”

Winnipeg Local blames province for proposed transit cuts

Talk about the pot calling the kettle black. Despite the Manitoba government’s own climate change plan calling investments in public transit crucial to lowering greenhouse gas emissions, the Brandon City Council recently voted to cut funding for public transit and the city of Winnipeg may do the same. The city councils call the cutbacks necessary because of a lack of funding from Manitoba Governor Brian Pallister’s administration. And Local 1505-Winnipeg, MB, agrees. “If you’re a student, worker or parent in Brandon who relies on transit, the Pallister government’s cuts are going to make life more difficult,” says Local President Aleem Chaudhary, who called on residents to contact local politicians to voice their concerns on the issue.

AC Transit drivers push for more protection after shooting

Dealing with angry, drunk and even violent riders has become part of the job for most bus drivers, including AC Transit operators in the Bay Area in California. However, when someone recently shot out the back window of a bus, Local 192-Oakland, CA, decided “enough is enough.” The Local, representing some 1,600 drivers and mechanics, is demanding better safety standards through grievance and, possibly, arbitration, as past requests to the transit agency have fallen on deaf ears. Local 192 is one of the more than 140 Locals that have passed the resolution to fix the bus driver workstation to prevent driver blind spot accidents, assaults on bus drivers, exhaust fumes in buses, ergonomically poor bus driver seats, and more.

Connecticut Locals join with allies to demand state address transit funding shortfall

Public transportation in Connecticut is facing a serious funding crisis as the state’s Special Transportation Fund (STF) needs to find $1 billion over the next five years or the state will have to cut public transit and road programs, and raise bus and rail fares. ATU’s Connecticut Locals took action to demand that the state address this problem that is critical to the economic future of the state. Locals 281-New Haven, 425-Hartford, 443-Stamford, 1209-New London, 1336-Bridgeport, 1622-Danbury and 1763-Rocky Hill joined with business, community, and transit allies to meet with ConnDOT Commissioner James Redeker to express their concerns and offer solutions. “We move Connecticut. The proud members of the ATU, who are the eyes and ears of transit in Connecticut on a daily basis, join with our riders and allies in support of increased funding for public transit,” said Local 1209 President Jaroslaw Pizunski.